Inspiration

I’m learning that writers block can come often but when I discuss writing the book with almost anybody, I am reinvigorated. Today, i stopped by a store in Framingham in a place that was once called Brackett’s Corner. I asked the man behind the counter who I assumed to be the owner if he had lived in Framingham very long. He said he grew up here. I then asked if he knew that where his store was was once called Brackett’s corner and had been a commercial center since the Revolutionary war. He had no idea. I discussed the Brackett Tavern and the coming of the Bracketts to the area and he was very¬†interested. I ended up talking to him for about 15 minutes while my father and son sat in the hot car wondering where I was. LOL!

In any case, I love talking to people who are interested in the topic and it gave me a sense of duty to continue my writing.

Tomorrow, I will meet with some very smart folks from the Framingham Historical society of which I am recently a new member. I have some specific questions on the connections between the Framingham Trowbridge Family and Justic Trowbridge who was part of the presiding council during the Boston Massacre.

I am putting together a list of questions today for these folks. I may get a chance to post them later.

I also received a great question from Alex Jung. A former co-worker and fellow soldier. With the recent display of the Magna Carta at the Boston Museum of Fine arts and the display of the Declaration of Independence at the British museum “for the first time”, Alex intelligently noted that it would not have been the first time. King George the IIIrd would have seen a copy of it in 1776. Alex wondered that, if he saw it, how did it travel and did we ever get that copy back? AWESOME QUESTION! something I want to look into…

And away we go….

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One Response to Inspiration

  1. cpoe07041776 says:

    What I am finding Alex is that we never intentionally sent one to England as the 2nd Continental Congress knew it had no legal bearing. The declaration had more to do with pulling public support and support from other countries. I am seeing that a copy made it to the Belfast Newsletter in Aug 1776 which may have been the first time it made its way to London.

    Here is a copy or you can try this link: http://interactive.ancestry.com/2193/32509_260472-02787?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fsearch%2fdb.aspx%3fdbid%3d2193%26path%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnBrowsing

    COpy of the Belfast Newsletter Aug 23 1776 - Possibly the first time the Declaration of Independence was seen on the other side of the Atlantic...

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